Do you know where the nearest Nuclear Power Reactors are to you?

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This post isn’t to scare you, it’s to simply inform you of a potential danger in case of a wide spread emergency or disaster or even a small leak.

Nuclear power plants generate a lot of power all across the world. However, they can also be quite dangerous if people are no longer around or able to maintain them or something goes wrong in which there is a leak.

We were watching an episode of Last Man on Earth and it had been YEARS after the virus had killed everyone (except for the few immune) and all of a sudden, all of the nuclear power plants seemed to be melting down at the exact same time.

This show has a lot of inaccurate information when it comes to the realities of survival, but I suppose it’s not supposed to be realistic.

I digress, it’s a fun show to watch. However, when it comes to nuclear power, if there is a malfunction and there are no people there to fix it or to continue to maintain it, it would begin melting down fairly soon. How long would it take to melt down? It depends on a lot of factors. We believe it would take about 6 months for the reactors to melt down with absolutely no maintenance. Could be sooner, could be later, but I doubt it would be YEARS later (I’m talking like 3-5 years). I’m no expert, though, this is just speculation.

Make sure you know where the reactors are around you! 

Click here for a map of operating nuclear power reactors.

If you live within 50-100 miles of a nuclear power plant, here are some things that you need to be aware of:

  • You would need to get at least 100 miles away. Some say 50 miles, but I don’t think that’s enough. I’d get at least 100 miles away, if not more. I wouldn’t want to mess around with radioactivity, would you?
  • This is absolutely a bug out situation. You need to have a bug out bag ready to go and have an emergency plan of action in place.
  • If you have been told to evacuate to a designated shelter, then you may be better off just evacuating to that shelter. It really depends on you and your preparedness.
  • Make sure you have some sort of radio device so you can listen to local news about for any emergency information.
  • Know any local sirens. If you live just a mile from a reactor, they may have a siren that will go off in case of evacuation. You’d be surprised how many people don’t know about sirens. There was a siren that went off when we were in Del Rio and it was simply a test that went off every day at noon. It freaked me out, though!
  • Know how to decontaminate yourself if there was possibility of exposure to radiation.
  • If you can’t evacuate or you’re advised to remain indoors, turn off the air conditioner, ventilation fans, furnace and other air intakes.
  • Shield yourself by placing heavy, dense material between you and the radiation source. Go to a basement or other underground area, if possible.

So, make sure you know where the reactors are around you and in the U.S. (or where ever you happen to live) and GET PREPARED! 


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